A drum & bass DJ mix for spring 2018

It’s been a minute since I recorded a new #drumandbass mix, so here’s a longer one, “Liquefaction,” 1.5 hours’ worth of new & recent tracks from labels like @HospitalRecords, @FokuzRecordings, @soulventrecords & @metalheadzmusic.

Here’s a track list, too (since Mixcloud only reveals the track list during playback).

  1. Danny Byrd, “Devil’s drop” 00:00
  2. The Vanguard Project, “Love call” 04:13
  3. Addiction & Villem, “Makes me feel fine” 08:04
  4. Etherwood, “Fire lit sky” 12:52
  5. Changing Faces, “Talk to you” 17:17
  6. Serum feat. Inja, “Blow them away” 20:33
  7. Revaux & Aslan, “Sinner” 25:09
  8. Moby, “Porcelain” (Pola & Bryson remix) 28:31
  9. Bert H & High N Sick, “Aurora” 32:45
  10. S.P.Y., “Alone in the dark” 36:41
  11. Fliwo, “Hypnotize” 39:22
  12. Bladerunner, “Kick off” 43:30
  13. Scar feat. Naomi Pryor, “The wrong side” 47:24
  14. Avalon Rays, “Don’t cry” 52:26
  15. Royalston, “Popular mechanics” 57:25
  16. Whiney feat. Inja, “Flashlight” 1:02:25
  17. Enei & DRS, “The process” 1:05:30
  18. Anile, “Allergens” 1:08:57
  19. Metrik feat. Rothwell, “We got it” (S.P.Y. remix) 1:12:13
  20. Digital feat. Villem, “Sun bites” 1:16:26
  21. Dilemma & Ownglow feat. Courtney Odom, “Mercy” 1:20:40
  22. Scar, “Make ’em know” 1:24:30

 

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It’s Fair Dealing Week 2018

This week (Feb 26-Mar 2, 2018) is Fair Dealing Week, a national campaign to raise public awareness of the importance of users’ rights in copyright law that further education, creation, and innovation. (Said rights are a subject of the federal government’s current copyright legislation review.)
See Fair-Dealing.ca to find out more; and consider signing the CAUT’s petition to the federal government to preserve (and if anything strengthen) the users’ rights in Canada’s amended copyright law.

I’ve contributed a testimonial of my own to Fair-Dealing.ca’s collection of statements from Canadian creators and educators:

Without fair dealing, licensing fees to excerpt even single lines from extant published works, especially works of poetry or song lyrics, could cost hundreds or thousands of dollars. Creative writers and authors need fair dealing no less than educators do.

If you don’t want to hear it from me, take it from no less a bona fide luminary than the late great Northrop Frye:

New poem in Toronto’s Into The Void Magazine

My poem “Heaven help the roses” — about Toronto’s famous Peace Lady, a.k.a. Pauline Davis — has placed as Runner-Up in Into The Void Magazine’s 2017 Poetry Contest. The complete poem is published at Into The Void‘s webpage featuring all contest winners (scroll down to the Runners Up section…but read the other winners too!).

It’s been almost one year since Davis died, and many more since she had stopped her public work towards the cause of peace, which remains as timely as ever (sadly). While I had hoped to get this poem published in Davis’ lifetime, I’m pleased it’s found a home with a Toronto magazine, since the Peace Lady is such a Toronto phenomenon — although her message is universal, and still urgent.

 

Prose poem in Unbroken no. 16

The open online journal Unbroken includes my prose poem slash flash fiction “Jumpcuteye” in its new issue no. 16, published today.

Unbroken (on Twitter, @unbrokenjournal) specializes in short prose pieces; its counterpart Unlost (@unlostjournal) specializes in found poetry. The editors of these journals are to be commended for promoting these less well recognized literary forms, and for doing so via openly accessible online platforms.

New poem published today in concīs magazine

It won’t pay to put in a pool, but seeing a new poem of mine in print today at concīs magazineconcis.io — is a fine Christmas bonus.
“Voyager 2, thinking, types things” is a sonnet made from humankind’s longest-range communications—intel from #Voyager2, as tweeted by @NSFVoyager2. (Thanks to concīs and its attentive editors, who are excellent to work with.)
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#TheMediumIsTheMonster: forthcoming April 2018

when the designer of your book’s cover (detail shown here) knocks it out of the park on the first try.
#TheMediumIsTheMonster: forthcoming April 2018 from @au_press.

Six things the public & the government need to know about fair dealing

Amidst ongoing efforts by copyright-maximizing lobbyists to mislead both the public and the government (which is now undertaking its 5-year review of the amended 2012 copyright act) about what fair dealing is, and what it means for Canadian culture, innovation, and education, here are six evidence-based points worth understanding about fair dealing.

  1. Over a decade’s worth of Supreme Court rulings have firmly and consistently enshrined fair dealing as a users’ right in copyright law.
  2. If Canadian publishers are hurting, it’s not because of fair dealing.
  3. In the name of authors, lobbyists against fair dealing antagonize and vilify educators — but many educators are authors themselves.
  4. Far from “pirating” protected works, educators actively promote authors’ interests, e.g. by ordering Canadian authors’ works in large quantities for schools and students to buy. (See p. 2, item 4 of CARL-ABRC’s Fair Dealing fact sheet.)
  5. Authors need fair dealing too, no less than educators do.
  6. Fair dealing augments and reinforces our Charter-guaranteed freedom of expression: any change to fair dealing (or to copyright more generally) must be understood as a change to free speech rights.

All these points are supported by case law and rigorous, evidence-based studies (by nationally recognized experts like Bita Amani, Carys Craig, Michael Geist, Ariel Katz, and Meera Nair, among others).

So next time you read that teachers are killing Canadian publishing, or stealing Canadian content, don’t believe the hype.