Tag Archives: Alberta

Parkland Institute holds annual gala dinner on Feb. 19

The Parkland Institute does non-partisan, political economic research on Alberta policy and society. Each year it holds a gala dinner to raise funds for its vital work; this year, the Parkland gala will take place on Feb. 19 at the U of Alberta Faculty Club, and will feature entertainment by singer-songwriter Terry Morrison.
If you have means and interest in supporting critical research on issues of vital importance to Alberta and Canada, please consider attending this event.

Link

The U of A Faculty of Arts blog supports and quotes from the AU Faculty Association’s stand on the Alberta Enterprise & Advanced Education Ministry’s  controversial “Letters of Expectation”:

“We should take their letter to heart.

“Its single most powerful sentence about the Government’s letter:

“‘The Letter, ultimately, is best understood as an attempt to justify the unjustifiable cut to the province’s postsecondary budget, a cut so deep – and made in one of the world’s richest jurisdictions – that it must be understood primarily as political, not financial.’

“The little university that could! Can we follow their lead?”

http://artssquared.wordpress.com/2013/04/02/faculty-association-at-athabasca-urges-board-not-to-sign-mandate-letter/

Alberta Diary blog quotes Frankenstein re: labour legislation

Well, the Alberta Diary blog is quoting Young Frankenstein, in this case.

Blogger David Climenhaga captions a screen shot of Mel Brooks’ version of the iconic “creation scene” as follows: “Premier Alison Redford, in lab coat, centre, and her Progressive Conservative cabinet get ready to bring Consolidated Bargaining to life.”

The reference to Brooks’ parody is itself significant: it signals the blogger’s critical assessment of Consolidated Bargaining as farcical.

It’s for samplings like this that I like my research subject: it turns up in lots of places, in unexpected ways, if often to tell a certain specific story (“the machines designed to serve mankind instead became the executioners of civilization…”). Historically, Frankenstein has tended more to figure labour, especially the working class, than government or business, but of course that’s because the traditional, corporate news media serve and revere the latter, and dismiss and revile the former. Perhaps the rise of “citizen journalism,” as a more diversified supplement to traditional corporate news, is likewise diversifying the possibilities for how journalism makes and spins intertextual references like this one.