Tag Archives: poetry

Forthcoming articles and reviews

I’m excited to announce a bunch of newly written (and co-written) articles and reviews have been accepted for publication and are forthcoming soon:

  • McCutcheon, Mark A. “Reading poetry and its paratexts for evidence of fair dealing.” Studies in Canadian Literature / Études en littérature canadienne, in press.
  • —-. “Paratextual and ‘sampladelic’ techniques for ‘committing centonism’ in contemporary poetry published in Canada.” Cento-Texts in the Making: Aesthetics and Poetics of Cento-Techniques from Homer to Zong!, edited by Manuel Baumbach, Bochumer Altertumswissenschaftliches Colloquium series, in press.
  • —. “Frankenstein meets the FAANG five: figures of monstrous technology in digital media discourse.” Beyond Modern Science: Essays on Frankenstein and STEAM for Charles E. Robinson, edited by Robin Hammerman. Delaware UP, in press.
  • Clitheroe, Heather and Mark A. McCutcheon. Review of The Expanse [TV series]. SFRA Review, in press.
  • McCutcheon, Mark A. Review of The Monster Theory Reader, edited by Jeffrey Andrew Weinstock, U of Minnesota P, 2020. Extrapolation, in press.

“Ravel” by Mary Dalton (a cento from Hooking, 2013)

This weekend I’m giving a talk at the Interdisciplinary Workshop on the Technique of Cento Texts, hosted by the Ruhr-Universität Bochum. The poem I’ll be discussing as a case study is “Ravel” by Mary Dalton, from her book of centos, Hooking (Véhicule P, 2013). I’m sharing an annotated copy of that poem here so other delegates can read it, since it is hard enough to find in Canada, never mind elsewhere. (I’m sharing this copy under educational fair dealing auspices, and will delete it from this post after the weekend.)

Link

Thanks to 49th Shelf for hosting my guest blog post about some poetry sources and inspirations for my own new book of poems, Shape Your Eyes by Shutting Them. Read the post at
https://49thshelf.com/Blog/2020/01/30/Poetry-Can-Only-Be-Made-Out-of-Other-Poems

New book: Shape Your Eyes By Shutting Them

It’s a delight to announce the publication of my debut book of poems, Shape Your Eyes By Shutting Them, from Athabasca University Press. At the link you can buy a print copy or download a free, open-access PDF copy. I’m a firm believer that open access doesn’t mean losing sales, it means gaining audience, and the audience for poetry (which has grown significantly of late) can always use broadening. Open access publishing with AU Press lets me extend a web-wide invitation to #OpenPoetry.

I’m surprised and honoured by the early praise given the book by two major Canadian writers. Di Brandt (author of Glitter & Fall) calls the book “a brilliant, crazy, deliciously carnivalesque romp through the surreal landscape of our times”; and Douglas Barbour (author of Listen. If) calls it “a wild mixtape of literary forms.” I’m inexpressibly grateful for these authors’ kind, generous words.

The book uses Surrealist techniques, like cut-up, juxtaposition, and détournement, in a fugue of poetic forms (centos, science fiction, sonnets, etc.) to tackle subjects ranging from love and work to anxiety disorders and ecological crisis. Moving from eroticism to the macabre and from transformative quotation to the individual idiom, the book enacts Northrop Frye’s claim that “poems can only be made from other poems,” and shows how citation is integral to creativity; authors need fair dealing too.

To give a sense of my work’s debts to others, I’ve created a mixtape of the songs that the book quotes, alludes to, or otherwise references. This mix sequences songs in the order in which their excerpts appear in the book. (Some poems quote no music, and some poems quote more than one song.) The mix includes all songs listed in the book’s Acknowledgments, and other songs from which the book uses short excerpts like titles or very short phrases. More than just further acknowledgment, this mix also means remuneration: Mixcloud pays royalties (to labels at least, and hopefully to artists too). And many artists featured in this mix are Canadian. (Support Can con!)

Whether you #OpenPoetry in print or digitally, I hope you like what you find. Thanks for reading.

Track list

00:00 Peter Gabriel, “Gethsemane”
01:36 Karyn Levitt, “Ah! Sweet Mystery of Life”
03:28 Heart, “These Dreams”
07:46 The Bee Gees, “More Than a Woman”
11:03 Shania Twain, “Man! I Feel Like a Woman”
14:51 The Zombies, “She’s Not There”
17:25 Wu-Tang Clan, “Da Mystery of Chessboxin'”
22:08 R.E.M., “So. Central Rain”
25:34 R.E.M., “It’s the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)”
29:12 The Tragically Hip, “New Orleans is Sinking”
33:13 Paul Robeson, “Ol’ Man River”
37:50 Michael Jackson, “Thriller”
43:47 The Jesus and Mary Chain, “April Skies”
47:44 Bob Geldof, “Thinking Voyager 2 Type Things”
55:54 Stevie Wonder, “Heaven Help Us All”
59:24 The Muppet Show cast, “Why Can’t We Be Friends”
1:01:35 The Boys Next Door, “Shivers”
1:06:20 Brewer and Shipley, “One Toke Over the Line”
1:09:43 The Velvet Underground, “Sister Ray”
1:27:05 Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, “Breathless”
1:30:11 Kate Bush, “Wuthering Heights”
1:34:48 Erasure, “Blue Savannah”
1:38:59 Sarah McLachlan, “O Canada”
1:40:39 Louis Armstrong, “I Guess I’ll Get The Papers and Go Home”
1:43:08 Tori Amos, “Tear In Your Hand”
1:48:06 The English Beat, “Mirror In the Bathroom”
1:50:55 Aphrodite, “Tower Bass”
1:56:24 The Spoons, “Romantic Traffic”
1:59:50 Enigma, “Mea Culpa”
2:04:21 Cowboy Junkies, “‘Cause Cheap is How I Feel”

Aside

It’s been a good week for writing: Carousel Magazine has accepted one of my poems for publication; Riddled With Arrows, one of my stories; and I just got my copy of the latest issue of Quills — Canada’s erotic poetry … Continue reading

New poem in Toronto’s Into The Void Magazine

My poem “Heaven help the roses” — about Toronto’s famous Peace Lady, a.k.a. Pauline Davis — has placed as Runner-Up in Into The Void Magazine’s 2017 Poetry Contest. The complete poem is published at Into The Void‘s webpage featuring all contest winners (scroll down to the Runners Up section…but read the other winners too!).

It’s been almost one year since Davis died, and many more since she had stopped her public work towards the cause of peace, which remains as timely as ever (sadly). While I had hoped to get this poem published in Davis’ lifetime, I’m pleased it’s found a home with a Toronto magazine, since the Peace Lady is such a Toronto phenomenon — although her message is universal, and still urgent.

 

Prose poem in Unbroken no. 16

The open online journal Unbroken includes my prose poem slash flash fiction “Jumpcuteye” in its new issue no. 16, published today.

Unbroken (on Twitter, @unbrokenjournal) specializes in short prose pieces; its counterpart Unlost (@unlostjournal) specializes in found poetry. The editors of these journals are to be commended for promoting these less well recognized literary forms, and for doing so via openly accessible online platforms.

New poem published today in concīs magazine

It won’t pay to put in a pool, but seeing a new poem of mine in print today at concīs magazineconcis.io — is a fine Christmas bonus.
“Voyager 2, thinking, types things” is a sonnet made from humankind’s longest-range communications—intel from #Voyager2, as tweeted by @NSFVoyager2. (Thanks to concīs and its attentive editors, who are excellent to work with.)
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Two new poems

Thanks to EVENT Magazine for publishing two of my poems, “What a name’s in” and “No family one pictures” — alongside superb work by other writers — in the current issue (vol 46 no 2, 2017).

Two new poems

Two poems of mine have appeared recently in literary journals:

“Shadows the words” is in this week’s (June 4th) issue of UnLost, a fantastic journal of found poetry that’s openly accessible online. This poem’s an acrostic (certain letters in every line spell a word) and a cento (a poem made wholly of lines from other poems)…so I think that makes it an acrosticento.

And “New patriot love” is in the current issue (#3) of Milkweed Zine, a bold and diverse queer feminist erotic ‘zine based in Toronto. This poem’s a dirty riff on Canada’s flag and national anthem — just in time for Canada’s 150th! 😉