Shrine Like The Sun: Summer 2016 Drum & Bass

“…dance clubs should be safe spaces. Where you can take #pride in yourself and freely express yourself. Where you can #BeYourself. This idea, this ethos has weighed heavily on my mind this week. This mix of newish tracks veers between darkness and light, dread and remedy. The track list titles sketch a kind of story, an all too familiar story. But it starts and ends with tracks that insist what a dancefloor should be: Shrine. Sacred Floor.”

Update: Dan Savage and Carl Craig have written good articles this week about the importance of dance clubs as sanctuaries. See Savage’s “What we find in gay bars and queer clubs” and Craig’s “On the importance of club culture after the Orlando shooting.”

Track list:
00:00 Artificial Intelligence “Shrine”
05:33 Whiney “Guardians”
09:12 Maduk “One way”
12:50 Boston “Conscious”
16:53 S.P.Y. “Hidden fire”
20:23 Alibi, Unreal & Dogface “Drop dead”
23:38 Dan Bowskill & Kalm “Living in the red”
28:12 Nitri “Shiver”
33:34 Bcee “The river runs dry”
38:08 Phase & Whiney “It means nothing”
41:15 Spirit “Interstate”
46:03 Bcee “Back to the street” (S.P.Y. remix)
50:28 Technimatic “Remember you”
55:05 Kid Drama “Red magic”
58:55 Maduk & Veela “Got me thinking”
1:02:22 LSB “Remedy”
1:07:33 Fred V & Grafix “Like the sun”
1:11:12 Bungle & Urbandawn “Sacred floor”

“The TPP will invalidate millions of dollars of tax-payer funded research in Canada”

Following the annual conference of the Association of Canadian College & University Teachers of English (ACCUTE) at Congress in Calgary, ACCUTE has posted to its English Matters blog a condensed version of my conference talk on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (#TPP):

“The TPP will invalidate millions of dollars of tax-payer funded research in Canada”: Implications of the TPP for Canadian literature and literary studies

The article identifies many major authors whose entry to the Canadian public domain the TPP will interfere with; and it highlights a few publishing and research projects that the TPP will kill, thus posing a waste of public funds and a cost to Canadians’ social literacy and access to knowledge.
The article ends with links and resources for how to “stop the TPP and the mess it would make of the Canadian public domain (not to mention the Internet).”
A full version has been sent to Canada’s Minister of International Trade, and submitted to the Government of Canada’s Public Consultations on the TPP.

Just published: “The DJ as Critic”

ESC-DJarticle_collage“The DJ as Critic”: my article in the latest issue of English Studies In Canada. Seeing work reach print never gets old, but the design of ESC is always exceptional, from typeface to pull-quotes.
This issue also features work by national treasures like Diana Brydon, Susan Brown, George Elliott Clarke, Smaro Kamboureli & Len Findlay, to name just a few…so I’m thrilled my words get to rub paper shoulders with such a Who’s Who of Canadian literature and literary studies.

This article is presently available only in the print edition of ESC; I will update this post when the article becomes available online.

UPDATE: This issue of ESC is now digitally available via Project Muse. The article is at this link, available to Project Muse users (i.e. postsecondary students and faculty). If you don’t have Project Muse access, but want a copy, just e-mail me a request for it. (That’s one way fair dealing works.) Eventually it will be openly accessible at ESC‘s website, but not for another year or so.

Deliquescence: Drum & Bass March 2016

My new mix of current and recent drum & bass tracks is streamable on Mixcloud. Recently, Mixcloud’s Terms of Service changed so a full track list isn’t shown before playback. (I’m assuming this change was made under pressure from the RIAA.) Which is why I’m providing the track list here.

Track List [artist, “title” (label)]

00:00 Keeno, “Land, Sea and Sky” (Medschool)
05:22 Lenzman & Forren, “Never Enough” (Metalheadz)
09:35 G.H.O.S.T., “Blood Brother” (Goldman)
14:58 Insomniax, “Lunar Dub” (Viper)
19:34 Document One, “Run the Block” (Technique)
23:01 Response & S.T. Files, “Wanna B 3” (Computer Integrated Audio)
28:23 Pola & Bryson, “Music” GLXY remix (Soulvent)
32:36 Semi Sense, “From Stars” (Liquid Tones)
36:49 Urban Dawn feat. Elsa Esmeralda, “Cloudless” (Hospital)
41:25 Keeno, “Bleary-Eyed” (Medschool)
45:15 Anile, “Stay With Me” (Medschool)
48:17 Subwave, “Tell Me” (Hospital)
52:55 Hugh Hardie & Pola & Bryson, “Lifted” (Hospital)
56:22 LSB, “If You’re Here” Luke’s Tangerine Dreaming remix (Hospital)

New Fronts in the Copyfight, Part 2

Now published, just in time for Fair Dealing Week 2016: Part 2 of New Fronts in the Copyfight, my guest-edited series in Digital Studies/Le champ numérique (DSCN). DSCN is an open access journal in the Digital Humanities. New Fronts in the Copyfight is a series featuring innovative, multidisciplinary directions in critical copyright studies. The new installment includes research articles by Dr Carolyn Guertin (author of Digital Prohibition) on digitally remixed creativity, and by Dr Daniel Downes (author of Interactive Realism and co-editor of Post-Colonial Distances) on a theory of “transproperty.” The installment also includes my review of Rosemary Coombe et al’s Dynamic Fair Dealing (2014), an excellent book, and a timely one, given the fast-approaching review of Canada’s amended copyright act and the copyright implications of the signed but not yet ratified Trans-Pacific Partnership.

New book chapter: “Institutions and Interpellations of the Dubject, the Doubled and Spaced Self”

I’ve got a chapter in Raphael Foshay’s just-published edited collection on Internet culture and politics, The Digital Nexus: Identity, Agency, and Political Engagement.

“Institutions and interpellations of the dubject, the doubled and spaced self.” The Digital Nexus: Identity, Agency, and Political Engagement. Ed. Raphael Foshay. Edmonton: Athabasca UP, 2016.

At the links you’ll find free, full-text PDF versions of the book and its individual chapters, including mine. (Athabasca University Press is an Open Access scholarly publisher that sells print copies and offers free PDF copies simultaneously.)
Here’s a quick intro to what my article’s about (and what a “dubject” is):

This essay develops the idea of the dubject as a model of remediated subjectivity. It will discuss some theoretical and institutional contexts of the dubject, and then will consider digital manifestations of the dubject with reference to how popular digital applications interpellate the user (see Althusser 1971)—that is, how they impose specific ideological and institutional conditions and limitations on applications and on users’ possibilities for self-representation. This work is an attempt to think digital identity and agency in the context of postcoloniality, as a complement to the more prevalent approach to mediated identity in terms of postmodernity. This work thus builds my larger research project of applying postcolonialist critique to popular culture, particularly that of Canada’s majority white settler society. (128)

#NaHaiWriMo Day One

February is “National Haiku Writing Month,” or #NaHaiWriMo on social media. The project, like haiku itself, seems straightforward but is deeply subtle: write a haiku each day this month. The event is based at this Facebook page.

My first foray, below, tries to meet all the criteria of organizer M.D. Welch’s checklist, which, like his other articles on haiku, is helpful and illuminating. (Personally I like the challenge of strict syllabic form, but will experiment with loosening up.)

in the bare-branched bush

sparrows hush as you pass: chilled

kids near a cop car